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Best PS1 Games Of All Time

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No one could have predicted that the PlayStation would become a household name for decades to come. When the console first released in 1994, it was a cutting edge technology that made use of CD-ROMs, which went against the grain of the extremely popular cartridge-based systems of the time. Over the next six years the console–known now as the PS1–made its mark on the industry and changed gaming forever. With a massive library of heralded games that pushed gaming into the third-dimension, the PS1 will always be remembered as a pivotal home console. Sony is now onto its fifth iteration of the PlayStation, and the company’s debut console laid the foundation for PlayStation’s rich history. The original PlayStation had a treasure trove of memorable games, but we’ve whittled down its impressive library to the 20 best PS1 games (listed in alphabetical order).

Ape Escape

Ape Escape
Ape Escape

No good could come from Simians on the loose, and in Ape Escape, it was your job to stop the monkey madness before it reached a boiling point. Ape Escape is beloved for a number of reasons, from its truly bizarre humor to the endless pop culture references it threw players, but it’s also fondly regarded as one of the first PlayStation games to make the recently introduced Dual Analog controller mandatory. For good reason as well, as feeling every shake and vibration of this manic monkey game only served to heighten the absurdity of those absurd apes.

Castlevania: Symphony Of The Night

Castlevania: Symphony Of The Night
Castlevania: Symphony Of The Night

Konami’s Castlevania series had always been a solid collection of action games, but they had rarely made major waves in the industry. That all changed with Castlevania: Symphony Of The Night, as this return to Dracula’s castle was a landmark in game design. While it felt like every game under the sun was chasing the 3D craze that new console hardware allowed for, SOTN instead sunk its fangs into substance over style. That’s not to say that the game wasn’t stylish thanks to its smooth animation, Gothic influences, and hints of anime in the art department, but those positives played second fiddle to SOTN’s RPG elements, non-linear exploration, and the part it played in establishing the metroidvania genre.

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Source: Game Spot Mashup